562-429-5300

Podiatrist - Long Beach
3816 Woodruff Ave Suite 302
Long Beach, CA 90808
562-429-5300

November 07, 2015
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Don’t live with pain any longer! Constant foot pain due to nerve damage can discolor your entire day. You may have reduced most of your activities, even the low impact ones, but still find yourself in pain. Well, don’t give up! We offer the latest remedy, which is a non-surgical and comprehensive procedure called Neurogenx. Neurogenx represents a state-of-the-art treatment option for a foot pain condition known as Neuropathy. Neuropathy most often described as tingling, numbness, burning, or stinging. Sometimes patients characterize neuropathy as being sharp jabbing pains. Until now, treatment options have not been highly ineffectively. Thankfully, times have changed!

Neurogenx, works by combining electronic signaling technology (EST) with an integrated nerve block (InB).  Treatment typically takes 20 minutes a session. Most patients need 10 treatment sessions, 2 times a week for 5 weeks (some may need more treatments for more severe neuropathy).  Neurogenx is more effective in patients with diabetes, restless leg syndrome, problems with sleeping, fibromyalgia, sciatica and many more. To learn more about who can use Neurogenx, please check out the neuropathy link that can be found on the home page.

It is important to remember that A Step Above Foot Care is always trying to provide the best treatment available.   Call for a consultation tcday.  

PROTECT YOUR FEET THIS SUMMER

  1. Limit walking barefoot as it exposes feet to sunburn, as well as plantar warts, athlete's foot, ringworm, and other infections and also increases risk of injury to your feet.
  2. Wear shoes or flip-flops around the pool, to the beach, in the locker room and even on the carpeting or in the bathroom of your hotel room to prevent injuries and limit the likelihood of contracting any bacterial infections.
  3. Remember to apply sunscreen all over your feet, especially the tops and fronts of ankles, and don't forget to reapply after you've been in the water.
  4. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout the day. This will not only help with overall health, but will also minimize any foot swelling caused by the heat.
  5. Keep blood flowing with periodic ankle flexes, toe wiggles, and calf stretches.
  6. Some activities at the beach, lake or river may require different types of footwear to be worn so be sure to ask the contact at each activity if specific shoes are needed. To be safe, always pack an extra pair of sneakers or protective water shoes. If your shoes will be getting wet, they should be dried out completely before your next wearing to prevent bacteria or fungus from growing.
  7. If you injure your foot or ankle while on vacation, seek professional medical attention from a podiatric physician. Many often only contact a doctor when something is broken or sprained, but a podiatrist can begin treating your ailment immediately while you're away from home.
  8. In case of minor foot problems, be prepared with the following on-the-go foot gear:
    • Flip flops – for the pool, spa, hotel room, and airport security check points
    • Sterile bandages – for covering minor cuts and scrapes
    • Antibiotic cream – to treat any skin injury
    • Emollient-enriched cream – to hydrate feet
    • Blister pads or moleskin – to protect against blisters
    • Motrin or Advil (anti-inflammatory) – to ease tired, swollen feet
    • Toenail clippers – to keep toenails trimmed
    • Emery board – to smooth rough edges or broken nails
    • Pumice stone – to soften callused skin
    • Sunscreen – to protect against the scorching sun
    • Aloe vera or Silvadene cream – to relieve sunburns

 

 

July 21, 2013
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Dos:

Whether you like to get a pedicure in the nail salon or at home, follow these easy Dos and Don'ts to keep your feet looking and feeling their best.

  • If you have diabetes or poor circulation in your feet, consult a podiatrist so he or she can recommend a customized pedicure that both you and your salon can follow for optimal foot health.
  • Schedule your pedicure first thing in the morning. Salon foot baths are typically cleanest earlier in the day. If you're not a morning person, make sure that the salon filters and cleans the foot bath between clients.
  • Bring your own pedicure utensils to the salon. Bacteria and fungus can move easily from one person to the next if the salon doesn't use proper sterilization techniques.
  • When eliminating thick, dead skin build-up, also known as calluses, on the heel, ball and sides of the feet, use a pumice stone, foot file or exfoliating scrub. Soak feet in warm water for at least five minutes, then use the stone, scrub, or foot file to gently smooth calluses and other rough patches.
  • When trimming nails, use a toenail clipper with a straight edge to ensure your toenail is cut straight across. Other tools like manicure scissors or fingernail clippers increase the risk of ingrown toenails because of their small, curved shape. See a podiatrist if you have a tendency to develop ingrown toenails.
  • To smooth nail edges, use an emery board. File lightly in one direction without using too much pressure, being sure not to scrape the nail's surface.
  • Gently run a wooden or rubber manicure stick under your nails to keep them clean. This helps remove the dirt and build-up you may or may not be able to see.
  • Maintain the proper moisture balance of the skin on your feet by applying emollient-enriched moisturizer to keep soles soft.
  • Use a rubber cuticle pusher or manicure stick to gently push back cuticles. If toenails are healthy, you can use nail polish to paint toenails. Make sure to remove polish regularly using non-acetone nail polish remover.
Don'ts
  • Resist the urge to shave your legs before receiving a pedicure. Freshly shaven legs or small cuts on your legs may allow bacteria to enter.
  • If you are receiving a pedicure and manicure, don't use the same tools for both services as bacteria and fungus can transfer between fingers and toes.
  • Although certain salons offer this technique, don't allow technicians to use a foot razor to remove dead skin. Using a razor can result in permanent damage if used incorrectly and caneasily cause infection if too much skin is removed.
  • Don't round the edges of your toenails. This type of shape increases the chances that painful ingrown toenails will develop. 
  • Emery boards are extremely porous and can trap germs that spread. Since they can't be sterilized, don't share nail files with friends and be sure to bring your own to the salon, unless you are sure that the salon replaces them with each customer.
  • Don't use any sharp tools to clean under nails. Using anything sharp makes it easy to puncture the skin, leaving it vulnerable to infection.
  • Be sure that you don't leave any moisture between toes. Anything left behind can promote the development of athlete's foot or a fungal infection.
  • Because cuticles serve as a protective barrier against bacteria, don't ever cut them. Cutting cuticles increases the risk of infection. Also, avoid incessantly pushing back cuticles, as doing so can make them thicker.
  • If you suffer from thick and discolored toenails, which could be a sign of a fungal infection, don't apply nail polish to cover up the problem. Nail polish locks out moisture and doesn't allow the nail bed to "breathe." Once you fix the underlying issue, then it is safe to paint nails. If the problem persists, be sure to visit your podiatrist.

                                                                                                                                                                                                        -APMA

By contactus
May 05, 2012
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May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month.

Skin Cancer does occur on the feet!  Get your feet checked if you have any questions about your feet.

What are Skin Cancers of the Feet?

Skin cancer can develop anywhere on the body, including in the lower extremities. Skin cancers of the feet have several features in common. Most are painless, and often there is a history of recurrent cracking, bleeding, or ulceration. Frequently, individuals discover their skin cancer after unrelated ailments near the affected site.

Causes

We often view the sun’s harmful rays as the primary cause of skin cancer, due to the fact that the condition is often found on parts of the body that receive the most sun exposure. While this may be true of some bodily skin cancers, it does not hold true for those that arise on the skin of the feet. Skin cancers of the feet are more often related to viruses, exposure to chemicals, chronic inflammation or irritation, or inherited traits. Unfortunately, the skin of the feet is often overlooked during routine medical examinations, and for this reason, it important that the feet are checked regularly for abnormalities which might be indicative of evolving skin cancer.

Types and Symptoms

Some of the most common cancers of the lower extremity are:

Basal Cell Carcinoma: Basal cell carcinoma frequently is seen on sun-exposed skin surfaces. With feet being significantly less exposed to the sun, it occurs there less often. This form of skin cancer is one of the least aggressive cancers in the body. It will cause local damage, but only rarely spreads beyond the skin. Basal cell cancers may appear as pearly white bumps or patches that may ooze or crust and are similar in appearance to an open sore. On the skin of the lower legs and feet, basal cell cancers often resemble non-cancerous skin tumors or benign ulcers.

Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common form of cancer on the skin of the feet. Most types of early squamous cell carcinoma are confined to the skin and do not spread. However, when advanced, some can become more aggressive and spread throughout the body. This form of cancer often begins as a small scaly bump or plaque, which may appear inflamed. Sometimes there is a history of recurrent cracking or bleeding. Occasionally, it begins as a hard, projecting, callus-like lesion. Though squamous cell cancer is painless, it may be itchy. Squamous cell cancer may resemble a plantar wart, a fungal infection, eczema, an ulcer, or other common dermatological conditions of the foot.

Malignant Melanoma: Malignant melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers known. Nonsurgical treatments are rarely effective and many remain experimental. This type of skin cancer must be detected very early to ensure patient survival. Melanomas may occur on the skin of the feet and on occasion beneath a toenail. They are found both on the soles and on the top of the feet. As a melanoma grows and extends deeper into the skin, it becomes more serious and may spread through the body through the lymphatics and blood vessels.

Malignant melanoma has many potential appearances, leading to its nickname, “The Great Masquerader.” This skin cancer commonly begins as a small brown-black spot or bump; however, roughly one third of cases lack brown pigment and thus appear pink or red. These tumors may resemble common moles; however, close inspection will usually demonstrate asymmetry, irregular borders, alterations in color, and/or a diameter greater than 6 mm. Melanomas may resemble benign moles, blood blisters, ingrown nails, plantar warts, ulcers caused by poor circulation, foreign bodies, or bruises.

When to Visit a Podiatrist

Podiatrists are uniquely trained as lower extremity specialists to recognize and treat abnormal conditions as they present themselves on the skin of the lower legs and feet. Skin cancers in the lower extremity may have a very different appearance from those arising on the rest of the body. For this reason, a podiatrist's knowledge and clinical training is of extreme importance for patients for the early detection of both benign and malignant skin tumors.

Learn the ABCDs of melanoma. If you notice a mole, bump, or patch on the skin that meets any of the following criteria, see a podiatrist immediately:

  • Asymmetry - If divided in half, the sides don't match
  • Borders - They look scalloped, uneven, or ragged
  • Color - They may have more than one color. These colors may have an uneven distribution
  • Diameter - They can appear wider than a pencil eraser (greater than 6 mm). For other types of skin cancer, look for spontaneous ulcers and non-healing sores, bumps that crack or bleed, nodules with rolled or "donut-shaped" edges, or discrete scaly areas

Diagnosis and Treatment

Your podiatrist will investigate the possibility of skin cancer both through his/her clinical examination and with the use of a skin biopsy. A skin biopsy is a simple procedure in which a small sample of the skin lesion is obtained and sent to a specialized laboratory where a skin pathologist examines the tissue in greater detail. To ensure that you receive the very best in care, your podiatrist will likely require that your skin biopsy be sent to a lab with board-certified dermatopathologists who have specialized training in the analysis of abnormal skin lesions from the lower leg and foot. If a lesion is determined to be malignant, your podiatrist will recommend the best course of treatment for your condition.


Content developed through generous support from Bako Pathology Services.

 
 

 

 

 

By contactus
March 27, 2012
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   Today is the ALERT DAY, the 24th Annual American Diabetes Association Alert Day.  It is a one day “wake-up call”, as many Americans don’t know they have diabetes.

You are invited to take the Diabetes Risk Test to evaluate if you are at risk for developing Diabetes Mellitus.  “Take it, Share it”.  Share the information with your friends that there is a test available. You can be saving lives.

Go to www.stopdiabetes.com and take the test!  Just answer a few simple questions.  Find out if you have diabetes or are at risk for developing diabetes.

Here at A Step Above Foot Care, we treat diabetic patients every day, and prevent foot problems.  If you or anyone you know has diabetes, they need to see a podiatrist to evaluate the feet and prevent any foot problems. 

 





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3816 Woodruff Ave
Long Beach, CA 90808